Breast Cancer--Take action for your Health!

Cancer. It’s become a bad word in today’s society, and for a good reason. It causes turmoil, outrageous medical bills, illness, and even death. However, advances in research can help determine if you have specific genes linked to cancer, which can prepare you for your future and your family’s future alike. Yes, you read that right, you can be screened for genetic alterations that can help determine your risk for cancer. The genes known as BRCA1 and BRCA2 are specific genes in the body that produce tumor suppressor proteins and are associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. These genes normally protect the body from cancerous cells; however, those with changes or mutations of the gene have much higher chances of developing breast and ovarian cancer.

PCSK9-Inhibitors----The New Statin

PCSK9-Inhibitors----The New Statin

Statins. When they work, they are great. They are inexpensive, they are usually covered by insurance, and they get your bad, or LDL cholesterol, to the levels where doctors want them at. However, not all statins work for everyone. In fact, about 1 in 5 patients on statins have failed to lower their cholesterol to satisfactory levels. This is because of side effects of drugs and because of genetic variations.  Not a problem anymore! The solution is a new injectable form of cholesterol-lowering drugs that the FDA recently approved. Let me introduce you to Praluent and Repatha. These medications are the future and the answer to the problems of any previous cholesterol-lowering drugs. They are a class of drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors.

Haptoglobin---is this the future of diabetes and heart disease?

Haptoglobin---is this the future of diabetes and heart disease?

Do you think you have heard or read every fact about heart disease and diabetes, the number one and number seven cause of death in the United States? Well I have news for you---- you have more to learn…and this news is life-altering! Say it with me, Haptoglobin. Yes, Haptoglobin. The October 2015 issue of the Journal of American College of Cardiology reports the Haptoglobin 2-2 genotype may identify individuals with diabetes to be at a greater risk for coronary heart disease.